Halliday’s Fiberly Art News 1

Sept 2, 2014  I begin my blog.

I have been frustrated that there isn’t a coordinating place where one can find news about art happenings that in my mind, are dealing with the concerns and materiality of fiber art.  We have had many exciting exhibits this past year that fit the bill.  The Mn Museum of American Art is doing a bang up job of featuring fiber art.  The Walker had the astounding embroidery of Jim Hodges as well as the plastic flower drapery that he created at Philadelphia’s Fabric Workshop. And the Textile Center currently has a wonderful show Jess Larson’s Women Troubles  of embroidered menstruation themed tarot cards as well as Bonnie Peterson’s  beautifully dense, After the Glaciers:  Geoscience Embroideries.   So I have taken it upon myself to begin a blog with art that interests me, as well as documents some of my doings.  I don’t know who’s out there to read it, but if you do, let me know your thoughts.

I just discovered that one of my all time favorite artists, Do Ho Suh is giving  a lecture at MCAD on Wednesday Sept 17, 1pm.  This news would leave me jubilant were it not happening during a rare vacation when I’ll be out of town.  This is an extraordinary artist whose work I first saw at the Venice Biennale, representing Korea in 2001.  He was showing an early example of the warrior robe he created from soldier dog tags that he manufactured,Some/One, a version of which was acquired by the MIA in 2013.  (Imagine my thrill when I happened upon it in the MIA’s Sacred  exhibition)

Coatofdogtags-300x224Since that first exposure, his work has wowed me over and over.  While exploring identity and notions of home, he created a number of pieces from organza, sewn of traditional pojabi by his Korean mothers and friends.  These translucent pieces of architecture are stunning.  Don’t miss him!

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I was busy over labor day weekend working on another “Private Public Art Experiment”.  This spring, in April, I happened upon a little clearing with fabulous huge vines.  Of course I wanted to turn them into something akin to a knit stitch.  I began to try to move them and created a base for adding wire.

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Finally on Labor Day weekend, I made my way back to the magical space, and found everything had been broken by the storms, and the knit wire was all collapsed on the ground .

I had no tools or materials with me blog 2 after storm expand planned to return another time.

But  I began lifting the fallen and broken vines into a form and found myself undoing the yarn so I could just see how it might all work.

 

Day 2_edited-1This took way too many hours but I did make progress and began to knit.   I found some sticks to use for holding the stitches.

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A yellow lab lunged and in got briefly tangled in the wire,  a little girl wandered by then yelled “there’s a lady doing art project”, and a hipster in dreads declared it “Cool!”   I kept meaning to leave as the mosquitoes bit, but couldn’t resist doing a just a little  more.

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visitor 1 As I was done for the day, a woman out walking (who turned out to be an MCAD alum) wanted to take my picture, exclaimed approval, and let me take her picture by it.

 

me pub 4Today, Sept 2, I returned with a knit cable wire section and formed a three sided structure.  The dimensionality is nigh onto impossible to capture but here’s glimpse of it.blog 6 whole photo 4_2_edited-1

My “Public Private Art Experiment #2 ” is still up, and here is a picture from the flooded spring.

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Meanwhile “Public Private Art Experiment #4 was removed.  I inserted a knit birch bark tree section into an elm tree trunk that had died.

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Someone came along after a couple of weeks, pulled it out and left it neatly at the trunk, so I brought it back home.removed irch